Peeps Redux

We are hard at work on Issue 03 and we are more excited than ever to get it to our readers. /03.04.2017

READ MORE

Fresh ideas on the death and rebirth of marketing

Interviewed by Aliah El-houni / Photographed by Nation Wong /08.28.2016

John McGarr, president and co-founder of Fresh Squeezed Ideas (FSI)—an award-winning brand and marketing consultancy—describes himself as a lifelong student of marketing, people and culture. John realized early in his career that he was interested in brand strategy and so, with his partner Karen McCauley, he started FSI. What began as a small research company has become a 20-person applied anthropology consultancy with clients across North America and in Europe. In his words, “It’s been a really fun ride alongside some very smart people.” READ MORE

Spy vs Ethnographer

Understanding the lives of ethnographers through the lives of spies | By Carrie Yury /04.17.2016

I have a confession to make. I am a secret, impassioned lover of detective fiction. Although I began my academic career pursuing serious literature, these days, I don’t read the classics. Instead, I read whodunits. Cozies. Mysteries. READ MORE

Peeps in the classroom

By Mitra Emad | Photography by Brett Groehler /04.19.2016

Professor Mitra Emad discusses how she and her class used Peeps Magazine as a resource this year. READ MORE

Soothe-sayers and storytellers

The healing capacity of narrative—by Emma Louise Backe /02.15.2016

When I cracked my head on the floor, words leaked out as quickly as blood from the wound in my scalp. Yet the damage from my brain contusion was as much internal as it was external. Blood seeped into my frontal lobe as I lay, head throbbing, in a hospital bed, ravaged by pain and fear of what had truly been broken in my injury. READ MORE

Introducing Peeps Magazine Issue 02: Crossing Thresholds

From the Editors’ Desk | by Anya-Milana Sulaver & Aliah El-houni /04.17.2016

Every issue we create starts with an idea. It’s usually a great idea. And then it evolves into something we could never have imagined ourselves as the contributions we receive are put side by side. READ MORE

Shifting the global conversation on refugees

/03.30.2016

Recently, vast numbers of people have been moving across borders, catching global media attention and producing complex responses from countries- those which host these refugees, and those which refuse. The same phrase is used repeatedly in describing the exodus: refugee crisis. READ MORE

Bricolage in a can

The story of one research team's journey into the brand culture of alcoholic energy drinks | By Gavin Johnston /03.24.2016

In its original formulation, Sparks was one of the first alcoholic beverages to contain caffeine. Its other original active ingredients included taurine, ginseng, and guarana, the backbone ingredients of traditional energy drinks. READ MORE

The changing face of Valentine’s Day

How Millennial values are redefining the landscape of love—Written by Megan Melissa Machamer /02.10.2016

Red roses, representing the color of passion. A pink box of chocolate to color code budding love and desire. A diamond necklace in a velvet, heart shaped box. You sit alone on your couch, frustrated that the last three commercials have not been directed at you—you are just trying to watch the game! READ MORE

Peeps Magazine through academic eyes

A review of Peeps Magazine by Leslie Carlin and Simon Coleman, University of Toronto /02.09.2016

The University of Toronto Anthropology program has been interested in Peeps Magazine since we introduced ourselves to them with our Kickstarter campaign last June. When the issue finally dropped in November, the program kindly offered up the services of Drs. Leslie Carlin and Simon Coleman to provide us with some constructive feedback and their thoughts. READ MORE

Why I love female superheroes

A close look at Supergirl and Jessica Jones—Written by Charissa Dechène /01.20.2016

In the summer of 2015, I bought a Supergirl keyring in the LEGO store in my hometown of Gouda, The Netherlands. The moment my eyes caught the keyring hanging on the wall I just had to have it. READ MORE

Portraits of the post-Mao generation

A photo essay of China’s much anticipated post-80s generation—Photos and text by Yuyang Liu /01.21.2016

In his work for Issue 01 of Peeps Magazine, Chinese photographer Yuyang Liu captured a day in the life of members of the much anticipated generation that anthropologist Graham Candy identifies as reputedly "only know[ing] of China’s rise in fame and fortune.” READ MORE

On the fall and rise of hands

Unraveling our ties to technology to remember the art of making things—By Elisabeth Bennett / Photography by Curtis James /12.10.2015

When we characterize younger generations today, perhaps what most differentiates them from others is their nativity and literacy in the digital age. We make much of this difference and contemplate how it affects and reflects language, brain development, and future innovation in technology. READ MORE

Authentic storytelling

An interview with Academy Award winning documentary filmmaker Cynthia Wade /12.10.2015

Cynthia Wade is an award winning documentary and commercial director known for intimate and gripping storytelling. Whether in a remote village in Cambodia or a conference room on Madison Avenue, Cynthia has been recognized for her ability to find and capture moving stories. READ MORE

Mindful of the mosaic

The Sensuous Geographies of Ethnic Festivals—By Kelley McClinchey /08.25.2015

Ethnic festivals benefit individuals and communities; not only for the community at large, but for recent migrants, first generation, second, or even third generation community members. Ethnic festivals may begin and maintain themselves as grassroots events, but others generate widespread notoriety frequently becoming hallmark events. READ MORE

Sound Advice

How names can shape consumer preferences—By Sam Maglio and Cris Rabaglia /07.28.2015

The study of language has the power to turn the average person into a mind reader. Take a look at the two figures above. If we told you that one of these shapes is called a kiki and the other a bouba, how would you match these names to the two shapes? READ MORE

The promise of big data

On bringing together two different approaches to research—By Tim Fisher /08.03.2015

As a curious six year-old, I studied each nook and cranny of the farm where I grew-up. I felt intimately familiar with every element of the landscape. Then, one day, my mother showed me an aerial photograph of the farm and it reshaped my understanding of the place where I lived. I now had two ways to see my world—an “on the ground” view that was filled with richness and nuance, and a view from above that helped me to place my understanding in a broader perspective. READ MORE

The long and the short of it

Reflecting on narrative, grief and violence in the wake of Baltimore—By Sarah Stefana Smith, Cultural Analyst /08.03.2015

In late April, I watched from Toronto as Baltimore, a landscape I had weeks prior inhabited, bubbled over from the confines of ‘respectable’ grief and rage. I encountered the first of numerous broadcasts quite off guard. I was sitting in the lobby of a hotel where I often went to write to use the free wifi. In the background the television screen flashed “Violent Riots in Baltimore” as CBC anchors offered up detailed accounts of looting and burning in the streets. How is one supposed to feel when watching their home in conflict? READ MORE

Breaking the princess complex

/06.24.2015

As a filmmaker and an anthropologist, I am always looking for films that explore popular topics from an unlikely point of view. George Miller’s Mad Max: Fury Road is such a film. READ MORE

Marking territory in the infinite

/05.25.2015

As an anthropologist interested in outer space, I was immediately struck by the implications of taking a flag off of our planet. READ MORE

Changing the shape of fashion

The new power of the plus-sized market—By Cat Ashton /05.27.2015

In the fall of 2011, at the One of a Kind Show in Toronto, I entered one of the clothing booths in the hope of finding a Christmas present for my mother. As I began to look over colourful sweaters and patchwork hoodies, the booth owner quickly moved to intercept me. “We don't have anything for you here,” he said. Mortified, I slunk away; the anger came later. READ MORE

My share of the sharing economy

Our cultural analyst and forum editor at Peeps reflects on her lived experience as part of the new Web 2.0-based sharing economy. /12.02.2014

READ MORE

Hong Kong, democracy and cultural myths

By Graham Candy / Photography by DM Chung /10.13.2014

Myths are the way we make sense of our world, they are the stories we are told, and in turn tell to others. Myths provide a sense of purpose in a complex world, and fundamentally, hope for the future. READ MORE

In defense of bias

On the nature of qualitative research—By Katrina Johnston-Zimmerman /05.18.2015

Let’s talk about bias. I have it. You have it. As humans all of us have our own opinions towards virtually everything that comes across our plates in our daily lives, be it (literally) a menu option or (the more serious) potentially deadly first impression. And researchers, from the molecular biologist to the cultural anthropologist, are not excluded from this inherent trait. READ MORE

Observations of an observer

A visual-ethnographer’s insights from the field—By Jacob Langvad Nilsson /10.13.2014

Youth are much more connected today than, say, 15 years ago. We are all more connected. And the same thing is happening in emerging markets, there are smart phones and internet cafes, and people know what is going on in other countries. READ MORE

What journalists get wrong about social science, according to 20 scientists

By Brian Resnick /01.26.2016

There's a constant conflict between social scientists and the reporters who cover them. It's derived from "a fundamental tension between the media's desire for novelty and the scientific method," as Sanjay Srivastava, who researches personality at the University of Oregon, tells me. READ MORE

The EPIC2015 Conversation

By Maria Bezaitis, Alexandra Mack & Ken Anderson /01.28.2016

EPIC2015 was notable for so many excellent reasons. São Paulo enabled an influx of new participants and presenters from Latin America, expanding the community and conversation with new colleagues and stakeholders as well as new ways of thinking about people that develop out of different cultural perspectives. READ MORE

Making the strange familiar and the familiar strange

Stepping into the shoes of an ethnographer—By Megan Melissa Machamer /06.19.2015

READ MORE

About Face

Why is South Korea the world’s plastic-surgery capital? / By Patricia Marx /01.29.2016

If you want to feel bad about your looks, spend some time in Seoul. An eerily high number of women there—and men, too—look like anime princesses. READ MORE

Why Design Thinking Won’t Save You

An old, but still very relevant article / By Peter Merholz /02.26.2016

Whenever I see a business magazine glow about design thinking, as BusinessWeek has done recently with this special report, and which Harvard Business Review did last year it gets my dander up. Not because I don’t see the value of design (I started a company dedicated to experience design), but because the discussion in such articles is inevitably so fetishistic, and sadly limited. READ MORE

A behavorial approach to product design

Four steps to designing products with impact—By Aaron Otani /01.08.2016

Understanding the psychology and science behind how people interpret information, make decisions, and take action enables us to deliver more effective designs. READ MORE

The anthropology of hackers

By Gabriella Coleman /01.25.2016

A "hacker" is a technologist with a love for computing and a "hack" is a clever technical solution arrived through a non-obvious means. It doesn't mean to compromise the Pentagon, change your grades, or take down the global financial system, although it can, but that is a very narrow reality of the term. READ MORE

How the arts add to urban economies

Performing arts organizations like opera or ballet help to attract knowledge workers—By Richard Florida /01.08.2016

A new study published in Economic Development Quarterly finds that the arts do in fact add to urban economies overall. READ MORE

An anthropologist unravels the mysteries of Mexican migration

Undocumented immigrants risk scorching temperatures, venomous creatures, and military surveillance to get into the U.S.—By Simon Worrall /01.08.2016

Despite the arduousness of the crossing and the high-tech surveillance systems arrayed against them, most of the survivors will attempt to cross again. READ MORE

The trials of Alice Goffman

By Gideon Lewis-Kraus /01.18.2016

Before the morning last September when I joined her at Newark Airport, I had met Alice Goffman only twice. But in the previous months, amid a widening controversy both inside and outside the academy over her research, she and I had developed a regular email correspondence, and she greeted me at the gate as if I were an old friend. READ MORE

The death and mourning for David Bowie

By Professor Deborah Lynn Steinberg /01.18.2016

"I was asked today if I would consider writing something about the death of David Bowie and about public mourning. This is awkward timing. The subject of mourning has become a vexed and maybe unwelcome one for me." READ MORE

Picture of a house—toward the ethnography of the academia

By Miia Halme-Tuomisaari /01.19.2016

There was a time when universities were modelled after churches. Today their designs echo temples of different kinds—namely corporate headquarters. In light of what is going on in the academia, this makes perfect sense. READ MORE

Dr Martin Luther King: “Public sociologist par excellence”

By Dr Zuleyka Zevallos /01.20.2016

Dr Martin Luther King Jr was born on the 15th of January 1929. Our American colleagues and others might know that King had a degree in sociology and theology (of course!). As the Blackwell Encyclopaedia of Sociology notes, King remains “a public sociologist par excellence.” READ MORE

Pleasure is good: How French children acquire a taste for life

By Marie-Anne Suizzo / Photography by Natasha Mileshina /01.08.2016

One of the most common New Year’s resolutions people make is to lose weight by dieting. The idea is that restricting the pleasures of tasty foods will lead to greater fitness and a finer physique. READ MORE

What was Volkswagen thinking?

On the origins of corporate evil—and idiocy—By Jerry Useem /01.11.2016

One day in 1979, James Burke, the chief executive of Johnson & Johnson, summoned more than 20 of his key people into a room, jabbed his finger at an internal document, and proposed destroying it. READ MORE

‘Design thinking’ is changing the way we approach problems

Why researchers in various disciplines are using the principles of design to solve problems big and small. / By Tim Johnson /01.21.2016

Much of our modern life, it seems, has been designed in the heart of Silicon Valley, so it made perfect sense that the concept of “design thinking” finds its greatest expression here. At least that’s what I learned over lunch with Doug Wightman, one of design thinking’s foremost proponents. READ MORE

Anthropology in business

For business, what do anthropologists bring to the party? / By Patricia Sunderland & Rita Denny /03.11.2016

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A review of Peeps magazine

By Steve Watson /01.24.2016

I first came across Peeps magazine last year as a Kickstarter campaign and was immediately fascinated by the premise of a magazine built around anthropological research and insight. READ MORE

Cultural Anthropologist Susan Kresnicka Reveals How Her Core Passions Help Hollywood Thrive

"I encourage our clients to focus less on trend-chasing and more on understanding the broader cultural forces." / By Kathy Caprino /02.01.2016

Susan Kresnicka works at Hollywood’s leading integrated branding and marketing agency Troika, spearheading their Research and Insights group. READ MORE

The water-cooler problem

Company success and employee satisfaction depend on social ties that are hard to forge in a globalized era. / By Alexandra Mack /02.01.2016

George Macartney had a bad day at work. The deal he was sent to close was rejected, despite months of advance negotiation. He followed the agreed-upon protocols, though they made both parties uncomfortable. He returned home feeling misunderstood and empty-handed. READ MORE

Cover story

/02.03.2016

You know the saying: you can’t judge a book by its cover. With magazines, it’s pretty much the opposite. READ MORE

When mainstream media thinks anthropology is cool.

Peeps Magazine recognized as one of the 'Very Best in New Independent Magazines' /02.06.2016

"At last, an indie mag about anthropology! If that turns you off, think again. Like the best magazines, Peeps is a magazine about people and there are some great universal stories here."— Jeremy Leslie, magCulture, quoted in AnOther Magazine READ MORE

Race is a social construct,
scientists argue

Racial categories are weak proxies for genetic diversity and need to be phased out. / By Megan Gannon / Photo by smcgee /02.10.2016

More than 100 years ago, American sociologist W.E.B. Du Bois was concerned that race was being used as a biological explanation for what he understood to be social and cultural differences between different populations of people. READ MORE

Why we post

Why We Post is a global anthropological research project on the uses and consequences of social media. /03.08.2016

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Ideo Reimagines The Future Of Planned Parenthood

The prestigious global consultants elevate Planned Parenthood's patient experience with human-centered design. / By Diana Budds /03.20.2016

In 2014, Planned Parenthood embarked on an ambitious collaboration with the global design consultancy Ideo to hatch plans that would help the nonprofit do what it does best: care for patients. Now, as Planned Parenthood celebrates its centennial, the fruits of that collaboration are beginning to take shape. READ MORE

Fast-world values

For all the smart tech, we still feel pressed for time. Are digital services the problem, or are we humans to blame? / By Judy Wajcman /02.08.2016

More than 40 years ago, as a young woman in Melbourne, Australia, I had a pen friend in Papua New Guinea. She lived in a coastal village, an hour’s slow boat trip from the city of Lae. I went to visit her. The abundant tropical fruit, vegetables such as taro and sweet potato, and fish fresh from the sea made up for the mosquitoes that plagued me. No one was in a rush to do anything. READ MORE

Get what’s mine: Formation changes the way we listen to Beyoncé forever

By Naila Keleta-Mae /02.15.2016

“Formation,” is a master class in how pop artists can clearly articulate political views that differ from the mainstream without being labeled didactic and marginalized by the media. READ MORE

The Facebook-Loving Farmers
of Myanmar

A dispatch from an Internet revolution in progress. By Craig Mod /02.14.2016

For six weeks last October and November, just before Myanmar held its landmark elections, I joined a team of design ethnographers in the countryside interviewing forty farmers about smartphones. READ MORE

The art and science of customer empathy in design thinking

By Kaan Turnali /03.27.2016

Customer-centric solutions demand empathy. But, how we employ this principle within design thinking is as critical—if not more—as what we do in the process. READ MORE

These New York kids are the future of
technical design

By Leo King /02.27.2016

The right STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education at a young age makes a massive difference in what career a child goes on to pursue. One New York City-based entrepreneur is transforming how that education is delivered, with a fantastic hands-on approach to learning and technology. READ MORE

Science Says Art Will Make Your Kids Better Thinkers (and Nicer People)

A new study supports our hunch that kids who are exposed to the arts gain benefits beyond just being "more creative." / By Jennifer Miller /04.20.2016

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My Indian Parents Are Huge Fans of Cultural Appropriation, Even While My Generation Finds it Appalling

To them, it was a sign of their culture gaining mainstream acceptance. To me, it was thievery and a selfish promotion tactic. / By Nikita Redkar /05.09.2016

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The bane of cultural appropriation

The campaign against cultural appropriation is part of the broader attempt to police communities and cultures / By Kenan Malik /05.06.2016

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21 New Magazines Rated for Feeding Curious Minds

By Arthurious /08.17.2016

It’s fascinating to see the printed magazine scene enriched with new voices and creative energy. I’ve scouted for some new titles—here’re 21 of them—read, dissected, and stress-tested by my bookshelf. The ratings represent the overall amount of curiosity you’ll be able to feed. READ MORE

Why big data is actually small, personal and very human

By Rebecca Lemov | Photo by Harald Sund/Getty/licensed by aeon.co /08.26.2016

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Getting the most out of Ethnography for User Experience

How reading ethnography has helped me to understand the power of observation and gain greater empathy with my users | By Quentin Parizot /08.31.2016

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How can design advance education?

Partnering with changemakers to design the most innovative systems, tools and experiences for learners of all ages | By IDEO /09.01.2016

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The new normal of urbanism in our globalized cities

A wonderful new podcast by two urbanists with years of experience studying, commenting on, and creating urban spaces. Coming from the perspective called "third wave urbanism", this is the new normal of human-scale urban thinking from a female point of view. | Podcast by Kristen Jeffers and Katrina Johnston-Zimmerman /09.11.2016

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Let’s Get to Work

Practical Ways for Writers and Teachers to Get Involved Right Now | By Anu Jindal /11.14.2016

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On being an ethnographer

| By Jacqueline Gallo /04.30.2017

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A conversation with Barry Lord
A conversation with Barry Lord

/02.24.2015

The museum planner and thought leader joins the dots between culture and energy. READ MORE

On placemaking

An anthropologist’s perspective by Katrina Johnston-Zimmerman /05.11.2015

READ MORE

A taste of the road

Ethnographer Bruno Moynié's road trip into the American South /08.25.2014

Imagine you are sitting down to eat, when all of a sudden you look up and see a bald, middle aged man, wearing a large skull ring and a dark t-shirt, who introduces himself to you with these words... READ MORE

Cosmopolitan moments

Diversity through the lens of Colin Shafer /10.13.2014

Participatory Photography project “Cosmopolis Toronto” combines collaborative authorship between subject and photographer to create a visual metaphor for Toronto’s diversity. READ MORE

The Extraordinary Dakinis

A conversation with artist Rima Fujita | By Carole McGranahan, anthropologist /08.01.2016

Brought together through their connections to Tibet, Carole and Rima met in person for the first time to discuss female strength and Buddhism, the ethnographic power of art, and Rima’s exhibition “Empowering the Extraordinary Dakinis” which ran earlier this summer at Tibet House in New York City. READ MORE

Peeps Redux

We are hard at work on Issue 03 and we are more excited than ever to get it to our readers. /03.04.2017

READ MORE

http://peepsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/fresh-ideas.jpg
Fresh ideas on the death and rebirth of marketing

Interviewed by Aliah El-houni / Photographed by Nation Wong /08.28.2016

John McGarr, president and co-founder of Fresh Squeezed Ideas (FSI)—an award-winning brand and marketing consultancy—describes himself as a lifelong student of marketing, people and culture. John realized early in his career that he was interested in brand strategy and so, with his partner Karen McCauley, he started FSI. What began as a small research company has become a 20-person applied anthropology consultancy with clients across North America and in Europe. In his words, “It’s been a really fun ride alongside some very smart people.”READ MORE

Spy vs Ethnographer

Understanding the lives of ethnographers through the lives of spies | By Carrie Yury /04.17.2016

I have a confession to make. I am a secret, impassioned lover of detective fiction. Although I began my academic career pursuing serious literature, these days, I don’t read the classics. Instead, I read whodunits. Cozies. Mysteries.READ MORE

Peeps in the classroom

By Mitra Emad | Photography by Brett Groehler /04.19.2016

Professor Mitra Emad discusses how she and her class used Peeps Magazine as a resource this year.READ MORE

Soothe-sayers and storytellers

The healing capacity of narrative—by Emma Louise Backe /02.15.2016

When I cracked my head on the floor, words leaked out as quickly as blood from the wound in my scalp. Yet the damage from my brain contusion was as much internal as it was external. Blood seeped into my frontal lobe as I lay, head throbbing, in a hospital bed, ravaged by pain and fear of what had truly been broken in my injury.READ MORE

Introducing Peeps Magazine Issue 02: Crossing Thresholds

From the Editors’ Desk | by Anya-Milana Sulaver & Aliah El-houni /04.17.2016

Every issue we create starts with an idea. It’s usually a great idea. And then it evolves into something we could never have imagined ourselves as the contributions we receive are put side by side.READ MORE

Shifting the global conversation on refugees

/03.30.2016

Recently, vast numbers of people have been moving across borders, catching global media attention and producing complex responses from countries- those which host these refugees, and those which refuse. The same phrase is used repeatedly in describing the exodus: refugee crisis.READ MORE

Bricolage in a can

The story of one research team's journey into the brand culture of alcoholic energy drinks | By Gavin Johnston /03.24.2016

In its original formulation, Sparks was one of the first alcoholic beverages to contain caffeine. Its other original active ingredients included taurine, ginseng, and guarana, the backbone ingredients of traditional energy drinks.READ MORE

The changing face of Valentine’s Day

How Millennial values are redefining the landscape of love—Written by Megan Melissa Machamer /02.10.2016

Red roses, representing the color of passion. A pink box of chocolate to color code budding love and desire. A diamond necklace in a velvet, heart shaped box. You sit alone on your couch, frustrated that the last three commercials have not been directed at you—you are just trying to watch the game!READ MORE

Peeps Magazine through academic eyes

A review of Peeps Magazine by Leslie Carlin and Simon Coleman, University of Toronto /02.09.2016

The University of Toronto Anthropology program has been interested in Peeps Magazine since we introduced ourselves to them with our Kickstarter campaign last June. When the issue finally dropped in November, the program kindly offered up the services of Drs. Leslie Carlin and Simon Coleman to provide us with some constructive feedback and their thoughts.READ MORE

Why I love female superheroes

A close look at Supergirl and Jessica Jones—Written by Charissa Dechène /01.20.2016

In the summer of 2015, I bought a Supergirl keyring in the LEGO store in my hometown of Gouda, The Netherlands. The moment my eyes caught the keyring hanging on the wall I just had to have it.READ MORE

Portraits of the post-Mao generation

A photo essay of China’s much anticipated post-80s generation—Photos and text by Yuyang Liu /01.21.2016

In his work for Issue 01 of Peeps Magazine, Chinese photographer Yuyang Liu captured a day in the life of members of the much anticipated generation that anthropologist Graham Candy identifies as reputedly "only know[ing] of China’s rise in fame and fortune.”READ MORE

On the fall and rise of hands

Unraveling our ties to technology to remember the art of making things—By Elisabeth Bennett / Photography by Curtis James /12.10.2015

When we characterize younger generations today, perhaps what most differentiates them from others is their nativity and literacy in the digital age. We make much of this difference and contemplate how it affects and reflects language, brain development, and future innovation in technology.READ MORE

Authentic storytelling

An interview with Academy Award winning documentary filmmaker Cynthia Wade /12.10.2015

Cynthia Wade is an award winning documentary and commercial director known for intimate and gripping storytelling. Whether in a remote village in Cambodia or a conference room on Madison Avenue, Cynthia has been recognized for her ability to find and capture moving stories.READ MORE

Mindful of the mosaic

The Sensuous Geographies of Ethnic Festivals—By Kelley McClinchey /08.25.2015

Ethnic festivals benefit individuals and communities; not only for the community at large, but for recent migrants, first generation, second, or even third generation community members. Ethnic festivals may begin and maintain themselves as grassroots events, but others generate widespread notoriety frequently becoming hallmark events.READ MORE

Sound Advice

How names can shape consumer preferences—By Sam Maglio and Cris Rabaglia /07.28.2015

The study of language has the power to turn the average person into a mind reader. Take a look at the two figures above. If we told you that one of these shapes is called a kiki and the other a bouba, how would you match these names to the two shapes?READ MORE

The promise of big data

On bringing together two different approaches to research—By Tim Fisher /08.03.2015

As a curious six year-old, I studied each nook and cranny of the farm where I grew-up. I felt intimately familiar with every element of the landscape. Then, one day, my mother showed me an aerial photograph of the farm and it reshaped my understanding of the place where I lived. I now had two ways to see my world—an “on the ground” view that was filled with richness and nuance, and a view from above that helped me to place my understanding in a broader perspective.READ MORE

The long and the short of it

Reflecting on narrative, grief and violence in the wake of Baltimore—By Sarah Stefana Smith, Cultural Analyst /08.03.2015

In late April, I watched from Toronto as Baltimore, a landscape I had weeks prior inhabited, bubbled over from the confines of ‘respectable’ grief and rage. I encountered the first of numerous broadcasts quite off guard. I was sitting in the lobby of a hotel where I often went to write to use the free wifi. In the background the television screen flashed “Violent Riots in Baltimore” as CBC anchors offered up detailed accounts of looting and burning in the streets. How is one supposed to feel when watching their home in conflict?READ MORE

Breaking the princess complex

/06.24.2015

As a filmmaker and an anthropologist, I am always looking for films that explore popular topics from an unlikely point of view. George Miller’s Mad Max: Fury Road is such a film.READ MORE

Marking territory in the infinite

/05.25.2015

As an anthropologist interested in outer space, I was immediately struck by the implications of taking a flag off of our planet.READ MORE

Changing the shape of fashion

The new power of the plus-sized market—By Cat Ashton /05.27.2015

In the fall of 2011, at the One of a Kind Show in Toronto, I entered one of the clothing booths in the hope of finding a Christmas present for my mother. As I began to look over colourful sweaters and patchwork hoodies, the booth owner quickly moved to intercept me. “We don't have anything for you here,” he said. Mortified, I slunk away; the anger came later.READ MORE

My share of the sharing economy

Our cultural analyst and forum editor at Peeps reflects on her lived experience as part of the new Web 2.0-based sharing economy. /12.02.2014

READ MORE

Hong Kong, democracy and cultural myths

By Graham Candy / Photography by DM Chung /10.13.2014

Myths are the way we make sense of our world, they are the stories we are told, and in turn tell to others. Myths provide a sense of purpose in a complex world, and fundamentally, hope for the future.READ MORE

In defense of bias

On the nature of qualitative research—By Katrina Johnston-Zimmerman /05.18.2015

Let’s talk about bias. I have it. You have it. As humans all of us have our own opinions towards virtually everything that comes across our plates in our daily lives, be it (literally) a menu option or (the more serious) potentially deadly first impression. And researchers, from the molecular biologist to the cultural anthropologist, are not excluded from this inherent trait.READ MORE

Observations of an observer

A visual-ethnographer’s insights from the field—By Jacob Langvad Nilsson /10.13.2014

Youth are much more connected today than, say, 15 years ago. We are all more connected. And the same thing is happening in emerging markets, there are smart phones and internet cafes, and people know what is going on in other countries.READ MORE

What journalists get wrong about social science, according to 20 scientists

By Brian Resnick /01.26.2016

There's a constant conflict between social scientists and the reporters who cover them. It's derived from "a fundamental tension between the media's desire for novelty and the scientific method," as Sanjay Srivastava, who researches personality at the University of Oregon, tells me.READ MORE

The EPIC2015 Conversation

By Maria Bezaitis, Alexandra Mack & Ken Anderson /01.28.2016

EPIC2015 was notable for so many excellent reasons. São Paulo enabled an influx of new participants and presenters from Latin America, expanding the community and conversation with new colleagues and stakeholders as well as new ways of thinking about people that develop out of different cultural perspectives.READ MORE

Making the strange familiar and the familiar strange

Stepping into the shoes of an ethnographer—By Megan Melissa Machamer /06.19.2015

READ MORE

About Face

Why is South Korea the world’s plastic-surgery capital? / By Patricia Marx /01.29.2016

If you want to feel bad about your looks, spend some time in Seoul. An eerily high number of women there—and men, too—look like anime princesses.READ MORE

Why Design Thinking Won’t Save You

An old, but still very relevant article / By Peter Merholz /02.26.2016

Whenever I see a business magazine glow about design thinking, as BusinessWeek has done recently with this special report, and which Harvard Business Review did last year it gets my dander up. Not because I don’t see the value of design (I started a company dedicated to experience design), but because the discussion in such articles is inevitably so fetishistic, and sadly limited.READ MORE

A behavorial approach to product design

Four steps to designing products with impact—By Aaron Otani /01.08.2016

Understanding the psychology and science behind how people interpret information, make decisions, and take action enables us to deliver more effective designs.READ MORE

The anthropology of hackers

By Gabriella Coleman /01.25.2016

A "hacker" is a technologist with a love for computing and a "hack" is a clever technical solution arrived through a non-obvious means. It doesn't mean to compromise the Pentagon, change your grades, or take down the global financial system, although it can, but that is a very narrow reality of the term.READ MORE

How the arts add to urban economies

Performing arts organizations like opera or ballet help to attract knowledge workers—By Richard Florida /01.08.2016

A new study published in Economic Development Quarterly finds that the arts do in fact add to urban economies overall.READ MORE

An anthropologist unravels the mysteries of Mexican migration

Undocumented immigrants risk scorching temperatures, venomous creatures, and military surveillance to get into the U.S.—By Simon Worrall /01.08.2016

Despite the arduousness of the crossing and the high-tech surveillance systems arrayed against them, most of the survivors will attempt to cross again.READ MORE

The trials of Alice Goffman

By Gideon Lewis-Kraus /01.18.2016

Before the morning last September when I joined her at Newark Airport, I had met Alice Goffman only twice. But in the previous months, amid a widening controversy both inside and outside the academy over her research, she and I had developed a regular email correspondence, and she greeted me at the gate as if I were an old friend.READ MORE

The death and mourning for David Bowie

By Professor Deborah Lynn Steinberg /01.18.2016

"I was asked today if I would consider writing something about the death of David Bowie and about public mourning. This is awkward timing. The subject of mourning has become a vexed and maybe unwelcome one for me."READ MORE

Picture of a house—toward the ethnography of the academia

By Miia Halme-Tuomisaari /01.19.2016

There was a time when universities were modelled after churches. Today their designs echo temples of different kinds—namely corporate headquarters. In light of what is going on in the academia, this makes perfect sense.READ MORE

Dr Martin Luther King: “Public sociologist par excellence”

By Dr Zuleyka Zevallos /01.20.2016

Dr Martin Luther King Jr was born on the 15th of January 1929. Our American colleagues and others might know that King had a degree in sociology and theology (of course!). As the Blackwell Encyclopaedia of Sociology notes, King remains “a public sociologist par excellence.”READ MORE

Pleasure is good: How French children acquire a taste for life

By Marie-Anne Suizzo / Photography by Natasha Mileshina /01.08.2016

One of the most common New Year’s resolutions people make is to lose weight by dieting. The idea is that restricting the pleasures of tasty foods will lead to greater fitness and a finer physique.READ MORE

What was Volkswagen thinking?

On the origins of corporate evil—and idiocy—By Jerry Useem /01.11.2016

One day in 1979, James Burke, the chief executive of Johnson & Johnson, summoned more than 20 of his key people into a room, jabbed his finger at an internal document, and proposed destroying it.READ MORE

‘Design thinking’ is changing the way we approach problems

Why researchers in various disciplines are using the principles of design to solve problems big and small. / By Tim Johnson /01.21.2016

Much of our modern life, it seems, has been designed in the heart of Silicon Valley, so it made perfect sense that the concept of “design thinking” finds its greatest expression here. At least that’s what I learned over lunch with Doug Wightman, one of design thinking’s foremost proponents.READ MORE

Anthropology in business

For business, what do anthropologists bring to the party? / By Patricia Sunderland & Rita Denny /03.11.2016

READ MORE

A review of Peeps magazine

By Steve Watson /01.24.2016

I first came across Peeps magazine last year as a Kickstarter campaign and was immediately fascinated by the premise of a magazine built around anthropological research and insight.READ MORE

Cultural Anthropologist Susan Kresnicka Reveals How Her Core Passions Help Hollywood Thrive

"I encourage our clients to focus less on trend-chasing and more on understanding the broader cultural forces." / By Kathy Caprino /02.01.2016

Susan Kresnicka works at Hollywood’s leading integrated branding and marketing agency Troika, spearheading their Research and Insights group.READ MORE

The water-cooler problem

Company success and employee satisfaction depend on social ties that are hard to forge in a globalized era. / By Alexandra Mack /02.01.2016

George Macartney had a bad day at work. The deal he was sent to close was rejected, despite months of advance negotiation. He followed the agreed-upon protocols, though they made both parties uncomfortable. He returned home feeling misunderstood and empty-handed.READ MORE

Cover story

/02.03.2016

You know the saying: you can’t judge a book by its cover. With magazines, it’s pretty much the opposite.READ MORE

When mainstream media thinks anthropology is cool.

Peeps Magazine recognized as one of the 'Very Best in New Independent Magazines' /02.06.2016

"At last, an indie mag about anthropology! If that turns you off, think again. Like the best magazines, Peeps is a magazine about people and there are some great universal stories here."— Jeremy Leslie, magCulture, quoted in AnOther MagazineREAD MORE

Race is a social construct,
scientists argue

Racial categories are weak proxies for genetic diversity and need to be phased out. / By Megan Gannon / Photo by smcgee /02.10.2016

More than 100 years ago, American sociologist W.E.B. Du Bois was concerned that race was being used as a biological explanation for what he understood to be social and cultural differences between different populations of people.READ MORE

Why we post

Why We Post is a global anthropological research project on the uses and consequences of social media. /03.08.2016

READ MORE

Ideo Reimagines The Future Of Planned Parenthood

The prestigious global consultants elevate Planned Parenthood's patient experience with human-centered design. / By Diana Budds /03.20.2016

In 2014, Planned Parenthood embarked on an ambitious collaboration with the global design consultancy Ideo to hatch plans that would help the nonprofit do what it does best: care for patients. Now, as Planned Parenthood celebrates its centennial, the fruits of that collaboration are beginning to take shape.READ MORE

Fast-world values

For all the smart tech, we still feel pressed for time. Are digital services the problem, or are we humans to blame? / By Judy Wajcman /02.08.2016

More than 40 years ago, as a young woman in Melbourne, Australia, I had a pen friend in Papua New Guinea. She lived in a coastal village, an hour’s slow boat trip from the city of Lae. I went to visit her. The abundant tropical fruit, vegetables such as taro and sweet potato, and fish fresh from the sea made up for the mosquitoes that plagued me. No one was in a rush to do anything.READ MORE

Get what’s mine: Formation changes the way we listen to Beyoncé forever

By Naila Keleta-Mae /02.15.2016

“Formation,” is a master class in how pop artists can clearly articulate political views that differ from the mainstream without being labeled didactic and marginalized by the media.READ MORE

The Facebook-Loving Farmers
of Myanmar

A dispatch from an Internet revolution in progress. By Craig Mod /02.14.2016

For six weeks last October and November, just before Myanmar held its landmark elections, I joined a team of design ethnographers in the countryside interviewing forty farmers about smartphones.READ MORE

The art and science of customer empathy in design thinking

By Kaan Turnali /03.27.2016

Customer-centric solutions demand empathy. But, how we employ this principle within design thinking is as critical—if not more—as what we do in the process.READ MORE

These New York kids are the future of
technical design

By Leo King /02.27.2016

The right STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education at a young age makes a massive difference in what career a child goes on to pursue. One New York City-based entrepreneur is transforming how that education is delivered, with a fantastic hands-on approach to learning and technology.READ MORE

Science Says Art Will Make Your Kids Better Thinkers (and Nicer People)

A new study supports our hunch that kids who are exposed to the arts gain benefits beyond just being "more creative." / By Jennifer Miller /04.20.2016

READ MORE

My Indian Parents Are Huge Fans of Cultural Appropriation, Even While My Generation Finds it Appalling

To them, it was a sign of their culture gaining mainstream acceptance. To me, it was thievery and a selfish promotion tactic. / By Nikita Redkar /05.09.2016

READ MORE

The bane of cultural appropriation

The campaign against cultural appropriation is part of the broader attempt to police communities and cultures / By Kenan Malik /05.06.2016

READ MORE

21 New Magazines Rated for Feeding Curious Minds

By Arthurious /08.17.2016

It’s fascinating to see the printed magazine scene enriched with new voices and creative energy. I’ve scouted for some new titles—here’re 21 of them—read, dissected, and stress-tested by my bookshelf. The ratings represent the overall amount of curiosity you’ll be able to feed.READ MORE

Why big data is actually small, personal and very human

By Rebecca Lemov | Photo by Harald Sund/Getty/licensed by aeon.co /08.26.2016

READ MORE

Getting the most out of Ethnography for User Experience

How reading ethnography has helped me to understand the power of observation and gain greater empathy with my users | By Quentin Parizot /08.31.2016

READ MORE

How can design advance education?

Partnering with changemakers to design the most innovative systems, tools and experiences for learners of all ages | By IDEO /09.01.2016

READ MORE

The new normal of urbanism in our globalized cities

A wonderful new podcast by two urbanists with years of experience studying, commenting on, and creating urban spaces. Coming from the perspective called "third wave urbanism", this is the new normal of human-scale urban thinking from a female point of view. | Podcast by Kristen Jeffers and Katrina Johnston-Zimmerman /09.11.2016

READ MORE

Let’s Get to Work

Practical Ways for Writers and Teachers to Get Involved Right Now | By Anu Jindal /11.14.2016

READ MORE

On being an ethnographer

| By Jacqueline Gallo /04.30.2017

READ MORE

A conversation with Barry Lord
A conversation with Barry Lord

/02.24.2015

The museum planner and thought leader joins the dots between culture and energy.READ MORE

On placemaking

An anthropologist’s perspective by Katrina Johnston-Zimmerman /05.11.2015

READ MORE

A taste of the road

Ethnographer Bruno Moynié's road trip into the American South /08.25.2014

Imagine you are sitting down to eat, when all of a sudden you look up and see a bald, middle aged man, wearing a large skull ring and a dark t-shirt, who introduces himself to you with these words...READ MORE

Cosmopolitan moments

Diversity through the lens of Colin Shafer /10.13.2014

Participatory Photography project “Cosmopolis Toronto” combines collaborative authorship between subject and photographer to create a visual metaphor for Toronto’s diversity.READ MORE

Curations

Let’s Get to Work

Practical Ways for Writers and Teachers to Get Involved Right Now | By Anu Jindal /11.14.2016

READ MORE ON electricliterature.com

The new normal of urbanism in our globalized cities

A wonderful new podcast by two urbanists with years of experience studying, commenting on, and creating urban spaces. Coming from the perspective called "third wave urbanism", this is the new normal of human-scale urban thinking from a female point of view. | Podcast by Kristen Jeffers and Katrina Johnston-Zimmerman /09.11.2016

READ MORE ON thirdwaveurbanism.com

How can design advance education?

Partnering with changemakers to design the most innovative systems, tools and experiences for learners of all ages | By IDEO /09.01.2016

READ MORE ON www.ideo.com

Getting the most out of Ethnography for User Experience

How reading ethnography has helped me to understand the power of observation and gain greater empathy with my users | By Quentin Parizot /08.31.2016

READ MORE ON www.medium.com

Why big data is actually small, personal and very human

By Rebecca Lemov | Photo by Harald Sund/Getty/licensed by aeon.co /08.26.2016

READ MORE ON www.aeon.co

My Indian Parents Are Huge Fans of Cultural Appropriation, Even While My Generation Finds it Appalling

To them, it was a sign of their culture gaining mainstream acceptance. To me, it was thievery and a selfish promotion tactic. / By Nikita Redkar /05.09.2016

READ MORE ON xojane.com

The bane of cultural appropriation

The campaign against cultural appropriation is part of the broader attempt to police communities and cultures / By Kenan Malik /05.06.2016

READ MORE ON aljazeera.com

Science Says Art Will Make Your Kids Better Thinkers (and Nicer People)

A new study supports our hunch that kids who are exposed to the arts gain benefits beyond just being "more creative." / By Jennifer Miller /04.20.2016

READ MORE ON fastcocreate.com

Ideo Reimagines The Future Of Planned Parenthood

The prestigious global consultants elevate Planned Parenthood's patient experience with human-centered design. / By Diana Budds /03.20.2016

READ MORE ON fastcodesign.com

Anthropology in business

For business, what do anthropologists bring to the party? / By Patricia Sunderland & Rita Denny /03.11.2016

READ MORE ON americananthro.org

Why we post

Why We Post is a global anthropological research project on the uses and consequences of social media. /03.08.2016

READ MORE ON ucl.ac.uk

Why Design Thinking Won’t Save You

An old, but still very relevant article / By Peter Merholz /02.26.2016

READ MORE ON hbr.org

The Facebook-Loving Farmers
of Myanmar

A dispatch from an Internet revolution in progress. By Craig Mod /02.14.2016

READ MORE ON theatlantic.com

Race is a social construct,
scientists argue

Racial categories are weak proxies for genetic diversity and need to be phased out. / By Megan Gannon / Photo by smcgee /02.10.2016

READ MORE ON scientificamerican.com

Fast-world values

For all the smart tech, we still feel pressed for time. Are digital services the problem, or are we humans to blame? / By Judy Wajcman /02.08.2016

READ MORE ON aeon.co

When mainstream media thinks anthropology is cool.

Peeps Magazine recognized as one of the 'Very Best in New Independent Magazines' /02.06.2016

READ MORE ON AnOtherMag.com

The water-cooler problem

Company success and employee satisfaction depend on social ties that are hard to forge in a globalized era. / By Alexandra Mack /02.01.2016

READ MORE ON sapiens.org

Cultural Anthropologist Susan Kresnicka Reveals How Her Core Passions Help Hollywood Thrive

"I encourage our clients to focus less on trend-chasing and more on understanding the broader cultural forces." / By Kathy Caprino /02.01.2016

READ MORE ON Forbes.com

About Face

Why is South Korea the world’s plastic-surgery capital? / By Patricia Marx /01.29.2016

READ MORE ON newyorker.com

The EPIC2015 Conversation

By Maria Bezaitis, Alexandra Mack & Ken Anderson /01.28.2016

READ MORE ON epicpeople.org

The anthropology of hackers

By Gabriella Coleman /01.25.2016

READ MORE ON theatlantic.com

‘Design thinking’ is changing the way we approach problems

Why researchers in various disciplines are using the principles of design to solve problems big and small. / By Tim Johnson /01.21.2016

READ MORE ON universityaffairs.ca

The death and mourning for David Bowie

By Professor Deborah Lynn Steinberg /01.18.2016

READ MORE ON warwick.ac.uk

The trials of Alice Goffman

By Gideon Lewis-Kraus /01.18.2016

READ MORE ON The New York Times

What was Volkswagen thinking?

On the origins of corporate evil—and idiocy—By Jerry Useem /01.11.2016

READ MORE ON theatlantic.com

Pleasure is good: How French children acquire a taste for life

By Marie-Anne Suizzo / Photography by Natasha Mileshina /01.08.2016

READ MORE ON theconversation.com

An anthropologist unravels the mysteries of Mexican migration

Undocumented immigrants risk scorching temperatures, venomous creatures, and military surveillance to get into the U.S.—By Simon Worrall /01.08.2016

READ MORE ON nationalgeographic.com

How the arts add to urban economies

Performing arts organizations like opera or ballet help to attract knowledge workers—By Richard Florida /01.08.2016

READ MORE ON citylab.com

A behavorial approach to product design

Four steps to designing products with impact—By Aaron Otani /01.08.2016

READ MORE ON Medium.com